http://BHARGAVAHOSPITAL.CO.IN
BHARGAVAHOSPITAL 5a5f0b2aa9425b10402be45e False 225 28
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'possible'
5
Just after your Cancer surgery You are likely to be sleepy. Exactly how sleepy you are and how quickly you recover depends on the type of operation, and the type and length of your anesthetic. People vary in how they feel straight after a general anesthetic. Some people feel fine but others feel • groggy • cold • sick • a bit confused • sad • anxious • tearful When you first go back to the ward the nurses carry on checking you – at first this is every 15 minutes. They gradually check you less often as you recover, so that within a few hours it is every 4 hours. The checks include your blood pressure, pulse, temperature and your wound. You have a dressing over your wound. You might have some tubes near it to drain any fluid that builds up. You have a drip giving you fluids into a vein until you can eat and drink again. You might also have a tube in your bladder called a catheter. This stays in until you can get up to pass urine normally. Pain control Pain can usually be very well controlled after surgery. Your doctors and nurses give you painkillers by drip or as tablets or liquids if you need them. For some operations you might have an injection of anesthetic into nearby nerves (a nerve block). This can work very well to control pain. You might also have a small pump attached to a drip so that you can give your own pain medicine as you need it. It is important that pain is well controlled, so do tell your nurse if you don’t think it is working well enough. As well as making you more comfortable, the painkillers also help you to move around and breathe properly, which helps with your recovery. Any pain gradually gets better as your wound heals. Possible problems after surgery There are some possible problems after any surgery. These include • wound infection • chest infection • blood clots • fluid collection around the wound Your doctors and nurses do their best to prevent you getting these complications. They ask you to help yourself too. Getting up and moving around as soon as possible after your operation helps to prevent chest infections and blood clots. A physiotherapist might also teach you breathing exercises to help prevent chest infections. To help prevent blood clots they teach you leg exercises and give you elastic stockings to wear while you are in bed. Your nurses might give you an injection just under the skin to minimise the risk of blood clots. After some types of operation, you might carry on having these injections for 4 weeks. Before you go home, your nurse might teach you to do these injections yourself. Or a district nurse might come to your house to do them. You might have antibiotics to help prevent infection. You may have them through your drip at first. But once you are eating and drinking, you can take them as tablets. You might also have drainage tubes close to the wound to stop fluid collecting around the operation site. This is important because, as well as being uncomfortable or painful, fluid that doesn't drain away can become infected. Below is a short video showing breathing and circulation exercises after surgery. Click on the arrow to watch it. Eating and drinking again When you can eat and drink again depends on the type of operation you had. Most people can drink and then eat on the day of their operation. After some operations, such as bowel surgery, you might not be able to eat until the next day. This is because your bowel takes time to start working again. When you do begin eating and drinking you might need to start slowly. Your nurses may suggest that you start with sips of water as soon as you are fully awake and then build up gradually. They will tell you when and what you can eat and drink. They might give you a carbohydrate rich drink to give you energy and help your recovery. Getting up and about How quickly you can get out of bed and move around depends on the type of operation you had. For most operations you get up the same day or the next day. Your nurses and the physiotherapist tell you when you can get up. They help you if you can't move around easily by yourself. It is good to get moving as soon as possible. This helps you recover and reduces the chances of other problems, such as a chest infection and blood clots. Seeing people Seeing people after an operation can be tiring. But as soon as you feel up to it, you can have visitors. It might help to tell people beforehand whether you are likely to have a drip or any other tubes so that they know what to expect. This is especially important for children. cancer specialist doctor in Punjab
ENDOMETRIOSIS Endometriosis is a painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond pelvic organs. With endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that can cause pelvic tissues and organs to stick to each other. Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available. Symptoms The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual pain that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain increases over time. Common signs and symptoms of endometriosis may include: • Pelvic pain • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) • Pain with intercourse • Pain with bowel movements or urination. • Excessive bleeding • Infertility. Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility. • fatigue • diarrhea • constipation • bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods. The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have intense pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all. Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis. Causes Although the exact cause of endometriosis is not certain, possible explanations include: • Retrograde menstruation. In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle. • Transformation of peritoneal cells. In what's known as the "induction theory, " experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells. • Embryonic cell transformation. Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty. • Surgical scar implantation. After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision. • Endometrial cells transport. The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body. • Immune system disorder. It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus. Risk factors Several factors place you at greater risk of developing endometriosis, such as: • Never giving birth • Starting your period at an early age • Going through menopause at an older age • Short menstrual cycles — for instance, less than 27 days • Having higher levels of estrogen in your body or a greater lifetime exposure to estrogen your body produces • Low body mass index • Alcohol consumption • One or more relatives (mother, aunt or sister) with endometriosis • Any medical condition that prevents the normal passage of menstrual flow out of the body • Uterine abnormalities Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche). Signs and symptoms of endometriosis end temporarily with pregnancy and end permanently with menopause, unless you're taking estrogen. Complications • Impaired fertility. Diagnosis • Pelvic exam • Transvaginal ultrasound • Laparoscopy. Treatment • Medications : Pain medications • Hormone therapy • Progestin therapy • Surgery ENDOMETRIOSIS TREATMENT IN JALANDHAR
Cytoreduction Surgery for Ovarian Cancer Cytoreduction literally means a reduction in the number of cells. So cytoreductive surgery refers to a treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in which surgery attempts to remove as many cancerous cells as possible. Cytoreduction can also be: Primary - The first part of cancer treatment. Interval - Done after some chemotherapy has been given. Secondary - Done after someone has had a recurrence of their cancer. Tertiary - Done after several recurrences of the cancer Best Cytoreduction Surgery for Ovarian Cancer in Jalandhar Topmost Cytoreduction Surgery for Ovarian Cancer in Punjab
Cytoreduction Surgery for Ovarian Cancer Cytoreduction literally means a reduction in the number of cells. So cytoreductive surgery refers to a treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in which surgery attempts to remove as many cancerous cells as possible. Cytoreduction can also be: Primary - The first part of cancer treatment. Interval - Done after some chemotherapy has been given. Secondary - Done after someone has had a recurrence of their cancer. Tertiary - Done after several recurrences of the cance Doctor for Cytoreduction Surgery for Ovarian Cancer in Jalandhar Best Doctor for Ovarian Cancer in Jalandhar
Bhargava Adavance Gynae Surgery Cancer Centre : State-of-the-art Infrastructure & Medical Facility : Highly Qualified & skilled team of doctors : Best Possible treatment delivered most efficiently at minimum cost :Two well equipped specious operation theaters for variety of Laparoscopic & other advanced surgeries. :Separate Labour Room for Maternity care : Professionally trained nursing staff provides care with concern :NICU for newborn emergency care as well as PICU, ICU & Day care center. : Rooms ranging from General ward to well furnished Semi Special, :Special & Sophisticated A/C Deluxe rooms with Nurse calling system & satellite TV, telephone facility. :In house Pantry & laundry services :Equipped with the complete modern central Oxygen system, with all modern medical equipments. : In house radiology unit :Fully functional in house round the clock laboratory and in house Pharmacy. : Highly professional & dedicated management team : Efficient support service system ensuring hassle-free-experience Best Gynae hospital in Jalandhar Best cancer hospital in Jalandhar
1
false